2007-01-08

Where was the previous Provence?

Travel and Leisure magazine declares that Istra is "the next Provence," whatever that may mean. This may well be the case, althugh it remains unclear just what this may mean for the present Provence or for any of the Provences which may have come after it. Before the next Provence pops up, though, they note the construction of some new sites for mass elite tourism and the intrduction of cheap air routes from the UK. My advice would be to avoid the better-known "beaches," which "sparkle as brightly as those of the better-known coast to the south" (why would you want a beach to sparkle?) and head inland.

7 comments:

Michael M. said...

I would second that advice. Although if you want to see thousands of half-naked German tourists, Istria is definitely the place to be.

Anonymous said...

Maybe sparkling beaches blind you to the quality of, and bill for, your lodging and food? :-)

Btw, I finally landed a job (thanks to Aaron and his project manager) in Podgorica, so I'll be heading more or less towards your neighborhood soon. Let me know if you are passing through to vacation at less sparkly beaches in the vicinity. :-)

Eric Gordy said...

Congratulations, Frank, and welcome back to Balkanland!

Anonymous said...

Congrats Frank!

Anonymous said...

I just wish these magazines would leave these little-known (from a world-wide perspective, that is) places alone. Now the maurades of readers are sure to cause the prices to rise and the natives to get more surly.

I thought, after the Croatian coastline below Rijeka being the next NEXT a few years back, that Montenegro and Turkey were on the NEXT list, thus leaving Croatia alone for a while.

Basically, articles like this decrease any possibility of us poor slobs acquiring any real estate for retirement back in the old country.

Eric Gordy said...

It's true, town after town is being bought up by internationals, and the market is tight. On the other hand, abandoned farms seem to be available for an affordable price, and if you have any construction skills, I'll come over and help you cook the stuff you grow.

Anonymous said...

Eric and Yakima_g -- Thank you! I can hardly wait to get over there!

Don't we already have something like two-thirds of the world's population living within 150 km of coastlines, and projected to increase as a proportional as well as absolute matter?

If so, I think the buy-up is inevitable. It's more a matter of better land use management and protection by states and localities. Starting with doing what Oregon does -- making all beaches (possibly also oceanside cliffs?) public access and a protected natural area not available for purchase, at least for the first several dozen meters, or whatever's appropriate. I.e., Thou Shalt Not Buy Or Build until farther inland. ;)