2008-02-14

Piće za mladiće

Way back in distant 1994, the ethnologist Ivan Čolović observed that whenever relations between Serbia and the "Republika Srpska" started to turn sour, the tabloids would increase the number of police chronicle stories about awful things happening to a "mladić" (young man). The implication being that some awful thing would happen to a Mladić (drunken murderer). So are we to draw any conclusions on the basis of this?

7 comments:

Aleksandar said...

Haha! Are we testing the waters here? Writing "Mlâdic" when we mean mladic, and seeing how the public reacts.

Serbian really needs to implement accents... for example

"kada hocu da se kûpam u mojoj kâdi prvo idem da kûpim kupku.." :)

Was this a problem for you guys when learning Serbian? My brother whose Serbian has, let's say, "deteriorated" since leaving Serbia, is infuriated when he has to read anything. He never knows where to put the emphasis. It's kind of funny... I tease him that he sounds like a "seljak" (no offence to people from the selo of course)

Eric Gordy said...

I see them in some texts, but only in books, never in magazines and newspapers. But I can tell you one I have never figured out: why sometimes people say imāmo instead of imamo. Is it just for rhythm?

Anonymous said...

The font color on the comments on this blog is way too light (when viewing comments attached to the full post -- not when you click on comments to view them exclusive of the post).

Eric Gordy said...

You're right, it is! Thanks for pointing it out, I'll fix it over the weekend.

Owen said...

It's strange - I was having problems with the grey comments, but a few days ago they switched over to the usual orange blue and black Blogger format.

Anonymous said...

Is Ivan Čolović an ethnic Croat? Seems a lot of them like to run down Serbs, but they never make analysis of Croat politics/personality/flaws with the same zest they do of alleged Serb flaws/traits.

Eric Gordy said...

How is making an observation about patterns of media behaviour "running down" any ethnic group, or a sign of any group's "flaws" or "traits"?

In any case, I do believe that my friend is from Krusevac, but do not believe that this explains any of the material from his very considerable and widely admired research. Nor is it likely that his political orientation is explained by his many years of employment at the Ethnographic Institute of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts.

You could explain his "zest" or lack thereof any way you wanted, but it would be probably be a good idea to know something about his work first.