2006-11-15

Democratic values and procedures

Certainly no democratic party is ideal. Still, I am not quite sure what my distinguished colleague was thinking. Even if I am a little bit charmed by his relativisation of the instrumentality of epic poesy.

3 comments:

Viktor said...

I've been getting this kind of signals a lot lately from DSS members - maybe it's their way of preparing us for their future coalition with SRS...
I have to do a post on Serbian political parties one of these days before elections, and i'd be interested in hearing your opinion, so there's an idea for one of your future posts as well (and all the other bloggers reading this comment:) ).

Eric Gordy said...

I'll work on it. If I were to make a guess now, it would be that after the January elections, the next government will be either DS-DSS or DSS-SRS, with the smaller parties mostly in a very minor role. The advantage for DSS of going with SRS is that they get to remain in power with a much stronger coalition (and be the public face of it), but the disadvantage is that after going openly into a coalition with SRS, they will never do well in an election again. The advantage of a coalition with DS is that they maintain their respectability, but would probably otherwise be marginalized from the real exercise of power.

But I'll definitely have more to say as this whole business develops. Nothing like an election!

igor said...

a bit off topic but anyway... I wasn't able to follow the referendum in Serbia too closely, but what was the explanation for not including Kosovar Albanians among the voters?